Larry The Computer Guy Newsletter

Boost Your Email Impact With These Smart Strategies

Most small businesses rely on email as their preferred form of communication. Either internally or externally to clients, customers and suppliers, email is the go-to format we’d be lost without. Our love affair with it is no surprise – it’s quick, simple and provides a paper trail. But its convenience doesn’t always mean relaxed. In fact, poor email communication can hurt your reputation and cost you customers. Here’s how to be smart with your business email:

 

Manage your inbox: Your inbox is only for items you still need to access. Once you’re finished with an email, you should delete it or archive it. If you were to imagine your inbox as physical letters, you’d never let it grow to a 6-foot high stack of chaos. Instead, you’d either throw them out or do the filing. It’s not hard to identify which ones to keep for reference, so create inbox folders to sort them accordingly. As emails arrive and are actioned, move them to the relevant folder or the delete bin.

Write professional messages: Stepping across the line from casual to careless is easy if you skip the basic elements of good business writing. Grammar will always be important and the sentence structure of your language hasn’t changed. All email programs include a spell-checker, many of which draw attention to errors immediately, so there’s really no excuse. Typing in all CAPS is seen as yelling, and breaking your text into paragraphs makes your message so much more readable. One last thing before you click send, quickly glance over your email to make sure your tone is appropriate and no mistakes have snuck through.

Embrace the subject line: Many emails are missed because the subject line was empty or meant nothing to the receiver. Writing these attention-grabbing nuggets can be tricky, but if you simply summarize the message, you’ll do fine. Just remember to keep them under 5-8 words so they fit on mobile displays.

Be smart with attachments: Keep attachments small – under 2MB – as they can clog up the email server. For larger attachments, share the file location as a link using cloud storage. When you’re sent an attachment you’d like to keep, save the file and then delete the email. And as always, be careful with unexpected attachments, especially from unknown senders. It’s more important than ever to scan all attachments with an antivirus before opening.

Keep your CC/BCC under control: The carbon copy (CC) and blind carbon copy (BCC) let you send the email to additional stakeholders, more as an FYI than anything else. As a rule, use BCC if you’re using an email list or privacy is an issue. But before you add extra people to the email, make sure the email IS relevant to them. There’s nothing worse than being stuck in a pointless email chain!

Call us at 248-360-8967 for help with your email.


7 Bonuses for Small Business in Office 365

You’ve seen all the ads for Office 365. They’re popping up on your desktop, your employees are sending you meaningful looks, and clearly, it’s not going away. You’ve probably even jumped online to see what all the fuss is about. But is Office 365 a necessary upgrade for your small business? The answer is yes. It’s more than a refreshed set of tools, it’s an efficiency and productivity powerhouse. Here are 7 spot-on reasons why small business owners should upgrade now.

Data security is built in

Office 365 was created with data security at its core. The built-in compliance and security protocols mean your cloud storage is safe, and you can control access so your valuable data remains exactly where you want it. Storing your data in the 365 cloud keeps it safe in case of emergency, with 1TB of storage per user included at no extra cost.

Ditch the licensing drama

Software version differences can be a real nightmare in a small office. Not every system can do the same things, and half the time, they can’t even open the same files. It quickly becomes a hodge-podge of workarounds and lost time. Office 365 includes site-wide licenses with upgrades at the same time.

Mail storage for real people

Not everyone lives in the land of inbox zero. In fact, most people tend to leave messages in their inbox forever. Occasionally we’ll do a quick clean up, but only when the alert comes in that the mailbox is full. Meanwhile, new emails from customers may be bouncing away with the old ‘mailbox full’ message. Eek! In Office 365, your employees can communicate without worrying about storage space.

Better time management

Every person in your business is juggling meetings, emails and contacts – usually across multiple platforms. Office 365 brings all those elements together, integrating seamlessly for more efficient time management. Contacts updated via mobile while offsite are automatically updated across all connected devices. Meetings scheduled in an email are added instantly to the calendar. You can even access files from any device, edit on the run and then back in the office, simply pick up where you left off.

Predictable costs

Forget about planning (and delaying) those costly upgrades. Office 365 has small business covered. You can choose a plan based on your unique needs and change at any time. You can even add or decrease the number of users as you scale and streamline. It’s so easy to fit Office 365 into your monthly budget while knowing you’ve got the very best and latest in small business software.

Work on the go

The days of fiddling with private network and security settings are over, thanks to Office 365. You don’t even need any special IT skills or extra software. Users can now securely access their files from home, during their commute, or in meetings for on-the-fly impressive presentations. Got an internet connection? That’s all they’ll need to squeeze productivity out of every day.

Stay up and running with no downtime

A whopping 25% of small businesses shut down permanently after flood, fire, crash or cyber-attack. With Office 365, all your data is stored in the cloud with built-in backups for redundancy. No matter what happens, your data will be there, letting you stay up and running – and always ahead of the pack.

If you are ready to take your email to the next level, give us a call on 248-360-8967.

Larry The Computer Guy – Newsletter

4 Simple Tips to Keep Your Internet Banking Safe

Online banking has boomed in the past few years to become the new norm. Branches are out and apps are in. Half the time when you visit a branch, you’re steered towards a computer for a DIY transaction – with optional assistance. But is internet banking really safe? You’re always told to keep your financial details private, but now also to jump on board the online banking train – talk about a push/pull scenario! The good news is you CAN bank safely online with a few simple precautions.

 

Always type in the website address

Many attackers will attempt to trick you into clicking a fake link to your bank website. Usually sent as a ‘phishing email’, they’ll claim there’s a problem and ask you to click through to your bank and correct it ASAP. The link points to a fake website that looks almost exactly like your real bank site and is recording your private account info. You can avoid scams like this simply by accessing your bank by manually typing in the website or using a bookmark.

Avoid public computers and networks

Jumping onto a PC at the library or mall might seem like a quick and easy way to check your account, but public computers are often targeted by scammers. In just a few moments, they can install keyloggers to record usernames, passwords and other private data, then sit back as all future user details are emailed to them. The same problem applies with free, unsecured Wi-Fi. You’re better off using an ATM or a data-enabled smartphone.

Use a strong password with 2- factor authentication

Create a unique password for your online banking, something you’ve never used anywhere else. Mix up words, numbers and symbols to create a complex password that can’t be guessed easily. Avoid giving attackers a head start with data they can find on Facebook, like kids names, pet names, birthdates, etc and really think outside the box. And of course, never write it down anywhere near your wallet, phone or computer. If remembering is likely to be an issue, you might like to consider a secure password manager app. Many banks will also help boost your security with two-factor authentication, sending random codes to your phone (or a special LCD device they provide) to verify any activity.

Check page security before entering data

Finally, take a micro-second to spot the small padlock icon before you enter any data. You’re looking for a padlock appearing as part of the browser itself, not just an image on the webpage. It will be either in the bottom corner or next to the URL. The address will also start with httpS:// instead of http://. If you don’t see these things, the page is NOT secure and you shouldn’t log in.

Would you like us to give your computer a new lease on life? Give us a call at 248-360-8967


Why is my Computer Running so SLOW?

Woah, who slammed on the brakes? Your computer used to speed through startup and let you open almost everything at once, but now it’s struggling to crawl along! Everything takes so much longer or crashes without warning. Something isn’t right. If it’s gotten so bad that you’ve found yourself drooling over the idea of a new computer, even though your system isn’t that old, we’ve got some good news: you can get your whizzy speeds back with a little TLC.

Computers generally start slowing down within 12 months, but it’s not because their parts are broken. And it’s not because they’re faulty. It’s not even because you have so many browser tabs open that you lose count. Slow computers have a number of causes, but the most common ones are easily fixed.

 

Background programs

Whenever your computer is turned on, it’s running programs in the background. You didn’t start them and they may not be essential to operation, but off they go anyway. You can’t even see some of them, they don’t have windows or anything to look at. A good example is your antivirus program. You don’t need to see it all the time, but you know it’s running in the background, protecting you. Over time, more and more programs might slip into the background and casually suck up your resources, like iTunes helper, Acrobat updater, Cortana listening, Skype or Spotify. We can speed up your system by setting these background programs to run only when you need them, or remove them completely.

Application bloat

How do you improve last year’s version of a program? Add more features! The problem with this is the applications become bloated with features you may not need (or even know about), but that keep needing more and more resources. Each time the developers review their programs, they assume you’ve bought the latest and greatest computer and can run whatever they release. This means a slow computer can sneak up after an auto-update. You may not even know the update happened, just that your computer is suddenly making you very unhappy. Eventually, your system grinds to a halt. We can remove unused applications or increase your computer power as required.

Slow hard drives

Your data is stored on a part called the hard drive. It’s usually a mechanical type that works like a record player, with a spinning platter and a ‘needle’ reading it. If your data is spread out across lots of places on the platter, the hard drive head ‘needle’ has to go backwards and forwards thousands of times just to retrieve a single file. Unsurprisingly, that takes more time to bring up your file. We can optimize your data to give the hard drive head a break, but an even better solution is to upgrade to an SSD. That’s a Solid State Drive that stores data in memory chips, like your USB drive, and has no moving parts. Without the physical need to move a hard drive needle, your computer can access data much faster.

Unfortunately, once your computers starts slowing, for whatever reason, the problem only gets worse. The background programs will continue to multiply, the bloat keeps coming, and the hard drive begs for relief. Rather than buy a whole new system though, it’s completely possible for your current computer to go back to being lightning fast – and for a fraction of the cost.

Give us a call at 248-360-8967 if your computer is running slow.

Larry The Computer Guy Introduces “Larry On-Guard”

LarryThe Computer Guy Releases an innovative new product to keep your computers up to date and problem free. This new product is like having good health insurance for your computer. Depending on the package you choose we will provide a level of protection for your computer that is just right for you. From our Larry On-Guard basic plan which is FREE to our Total protection plan we have a plan that will fit your budget.

It is so important today that your computer is kept fully updated with all the operating system patches that are available. RansomeWare like WannaCry could have been prevented in over 100,000 cases if the infected operating systems had been kept updated. Our Plans offer a level of service that will fit your budget. You can pick from our Basic Plan that will monitor your system and alert you for free, all the way up to our Total Protection plan, that will not only monitor everything on your computer, but will provide you with an online “cloud backup” to further protect your data from future threats.

These plans can either be purchased on a month to month basis or yearly at a 20% savings. With the plan you will also receive our great customer support and up to a 20% discount on labor depending on the package you choose.

Call us today and and experience what Larry On-Guard can do for you. 248-360-8967

Special Limited Offer

For all yearly subscribers call in and signup by July 21st and if you pay yearly, you will receive an additional 10% off the annual price for the first year. That is an additional SAVINGS of $21 on our Total Protection Plan. Mention Coupon Code Larry On-Guard10 to receive this promotion.

Don’t wait until you get infected and lose all your valuable data, get protected today!

Call 248-360-8967

 

Windows 10 updates are much more agressive

Tired of the relentless popups for Windows 10?

Over the last couple of weeks the nagging from Microsoft for Windows 10 has gotten muchwindows upgrade more aggressive. It seems that they want everyone to upgrade now. Our position still stands, that you should hold off upgrading for a while yet. We have seen some great improvements when it comes to having the correct drivers and the stability of the operating system has improved greatly. There are still known graphic issues with older laptops and tablets. If you have a Windows 7 laptop, your best bet is to wait until you need a new laptop and then go to Windows 10. If you have a desktop more and more drivers are coming available for upgrading.

We currently also have a tool to prevent the upgrade process to Windows 10. This tool removes the nagging messages from Microsoft about updating. If you would like the relentless Windows 10 nagging to be removed we charge $25 per computer, to do that.

Larry The Computer Guy

Serving SE Michigan

248-360-8967

Future computing: The Internet of Things

Some thirty years ago, the personal computer revolution began — and no other technology has evolved more quickly.

Now there a new revolution, often referred to as the Internet of Things. Here’s what you need to know about it.

The term Internet of Things (IoT) made little sense to me when I first heard it. I thought: “Oh no! Not another meaningless tech-industry marketing term — like Web 2.0.” But then I visited my pool-supply store and the sales person asked me whether I wanted to connect my pool pump to the Internet.

As you might expect, my first reaction was: “Why?” I left the store a bit bewildered and spent the next several months looking into the topic of new Internet-connected devices. What I’ve discovered took me by surprise — and I teach computer technology.

The Internet of Things extends far beyond just attaching your thermostat (or pool pump) to the Internet. In the broader sense, IoT could encompass any instance in which objects or organisms (including people) are fitted with sensors that collect and transfer data over a computer network. No human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction is required.

IoT isn’t driven simply by convenience; the ultimate goal is collecting and processing large amounts of data in real time. More than fifty years of technology discovery and development has brought us to this point.

For example, with nanotechnology (more info), we can now build data-collecting sensors that measure in billionths of an inch. These tiny devices are described as nanoelectromechanical systems — or the somewhat larger microelectromechanical systems (MEMS; more info).

finger print

Building a ubiquitous data-collection system

These data sensors are so inexpensive and so tiny they can be placed everywhere: in cars, homes, clothes — and even in our bodies. That potential flood of data collection would easily overwhelm our current IPv4 Internet-addressing scheme. Which is why we’re moving to the more-capable IPv6 (more info).

This newer addressing system uses 128 bits, an address space so large that each person on earth could be given a few Octillion (10 to the power of 27) IP addresses and there would still be a lot of addresses left over. In short, it will be nearly impossible to run out of IPv6 addresses.

With many ways to collect data, we also need ways to move the information to the computers that will process it. In the past, this connection was via Ethernet cabling. But now we live a mobile world. Advances in Wi-Fi and cellular transmission rates now make it more practical to move mountains of data wirelessly. And if GPS is added to a sensor, we can know exactly where the data came from.

Data processing has also grown exponentially over recent years. Massive server farms and cloud-storage facilities make real-time processing of huge amounts of data — popularly called Big Data — cheap and practical. (Cloud storage is about a tenth the cost of local storage.) And all this “Big Data” is now stored in “Data Lakes,” where it might reside for years or even decades to come.

Currently, hard drives still do the heavy lifting in data storage. But tech companies are working on new forms of computer memory (RAM) and data storage. For example, Carbon nano tubes (CNT; more info) could increase storage in our devices up to a thousandfold — while using less electricity. It’s quite possible that in the next five to 10 years, your smartphone might have 10TB of RAM/disk storage and a month of battery life.

And what becomes of all this collected information? Businesses use sophisticated data analytics to process it — outwardly to “make our lives better,” but mostly to make a profit. For the most part, the information is cleaned, sorted, and combined with other data to build models of our online behavior. That information is then used essentially to convince us to purchase products and services.

Connecting everything to the Internet

What does the Internet of Things offer us today? It’s far more than you might realize. You might be familiar with products such as the Nest (site) thermostats and smoke alarms; or wearables such as Fitbit devices that monitor heath and exercise.

But IoT is rapidly expanding into more prosaic things; for example, I found a BBQ propane-tank sensor that will notify you that it needs refilling or that you forgot to turn off your gas grill. And then there’s that pool pump I mentioned that can be monitored and controlled via a smartphone app.

Other uses of IoT include monitoring your wine collection. Sensors embedded in corks report temperature, acidity, bottle location, and other properties. IoT sensors are being used in casino chips and golf balls to track location and movement. A golfer’s performance can be monitored and tracked over time. Parking spaces can be fitted with IoT sensors; as you enter a parking garage, you can be notified ahead of getting to it where an open space is located. Power companies are using IoT in appliances and solar systems to manage and track energy usage.

And that’s just the consumer side. Things get really interesting when you look at IoT for the business-to-business (B2B) market. Farming, automotive, security, and heath care are taking advantage of Internet connectivity.

In farming, for example, cameras have been mounted on booms attached to tractors. As the machines are driven though the fields, the cameras take images of each plant and also record its GPS location. An onboard computer system processes the images in real time and determines whether a particular plant needs a shot of fertilizer, pesticide, or water — or is doing fine. The health of the plant is recorded and archived (again, Big Data) so that farmers can make year-over-year comparisons.

For the dark side of electronics in farm equipment — and our cars — see a related Wired story. It tells why we don’t really own the vehicles we think we paid for.

Many newer cars already have Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity built in. Your next new car will most likely have at least four high-definition (HD) cameras, a hundred or so performance sensors, and a cellular data-service plan — not for you, but for the automobile manufacturer to keep tabs on the car.

 

car

You and millions of other drivers will be “testing consumers,” so manufacturers can produce better cars. But they’ll also be able to monitor wear and tear on individual vehicles. In theory, they could use GPS data to tell you, via your onboard navigation/information system, that it’s time to change the oil — and here’s the location of the nearest dealer.

Onboard cameras and computers can now prevent unsafe lane changes, assist in emergency braking, and help with parking. The videos from the cameras can be stored, so should you have an accident, the images can be downloaded and used for any follow-up investigation.

IoT is rapidly finding its way into security. For example, retail stores that suffer heavy losses to shoplifters might install wireless cameras. Though some are visible, others are hidden. Yes, that mannequin actually is watching you.

These connected cameras can capture the face of anyone who enters the store; they then immediately compare that information against a list of known shoplifters. If there’s a match, the store’s security staff can then track the person’s movements throughout the store.

IoT, Big Data, and cloud storage let stores share a common database of known shoplifters. Someone caught stealing at the local department store will be recognized and watched at the nearby home-improvement store. The next time you enter a store, check out your image on a conspicuously placed, high-definition screen; it’s there to remind you that you’re being watched.

Residents of my town are concerned about the number of robberies. To help the police, some homeowners are installing IoT cameras that are connected to systems running License Plate Recognition (LPR) software. Every car that drives by has its license plate recorded with the LPR software. If a particular car was used in a previous burglary, homeowners, neighborhood watch groups, and the police are immediately notified. When a large number of homeowners install these cameras, the path the burglars take can be tracked by police in real time. (This obviously raises privacy issues. It might also be adapted for unwarranted profiling.)

In health care, IoT-equipped pacemakers monitor heart rhythm. If a pacemaker detects an abnormal rhythm, it can notify a doctor, dispatch emergency-medical personnel, and initiate treatment. Moreover, if the device is equipped with GPS, it can send out your exact location.

IoT is assisting with pain management and neurological diseases. I was recently told that doctors have imbedded Windows 10 computers into patients. Using wireless connections and the Internet, doctors can remotely manage pain or, in the case of those with neurological diseases, send software updates that help patients cope with their illness.

The dark side of ubiquitous IoT applications

We are a well aware of security on our phones and computers. But the concept of billions of devices connected to the Web raises real concerns over hacking, privacy, and personal security. For example, there was an uproar when it was shown that smart TVs might be capable of sending private conversations back to Web servers. And it was recently shown that hackers could take control of cars remotely. Anything attached to the Internet is a potential target.

Potentially more difficult, will be finding a balance between security and privacy. For many, having your neighbor record your comings and goings and sending that data to police computers is unacceptable. But if you’ve been the victim of a burglary, you might think it’s okay. And will you be comfortable knowing that your car’s manufacturer — and possibly your insurance company — can track your driving habits?

Again, one of the foundations of IoT is targeted marketing. Not too long ago, a woman who was still in high school began receiving drugstore ads targeting pregnant women. The woman’s father (angrily) asked the chain store that sent out the ads why; he was told that, thanks to Big Data, it knew his daughter was pregnant. I’m sure that’s not the way we’d want to learn about a loved one’s private matters.

Gleaned from windows Secrets article by Doug Spindler

Larry The Computer Guy

Serving South Eastern Michigan

248-360-8967

Microsoft Outlook is Crashing after recent update.

Outlook Crashing after recent update!

The software giant confirmed in an emailed statement to ZDNet that some users might be suffering from a Patch Tuesday hangover.

“We are looking into reports from some customers who are experiencing difficulties with Outlook after installing Windows KB3097877. An immediate review is under way,” said a spokesperson.

Many on Twitter also pointed to the patch, also known as MS15-115), a critical update affecting all versions of Windows, as the one to blame. The patch fixes a series of flaws that could allow an attacker to remotely execute code on an affected machine by exploiting how the operating system handles and displays fonts.

Some users have reported that Outlook crashes only when web-formatted (HTML) emails are displayed.

Earlier, download links posted on the security bulletins point to files disappeared off the site, but returned by mid-afternoon.

Gleened from zdnet.com

What can I do to make my laptop computer last a lot longer? Call Larry The Computer Guy 248-360-8967

Make your laptop last longer.

Make your laptop last longer.

What can I do to make my laptop computer last a lot longer? Call Larry The Computer Guy!

 

  • Avoid using your laptop on soft surfaces like beds, couches and pillows. This blocks the laptop’s air vents, causing your laptop to heat up. Hot internal components wear out faster than cool ones.
  • Clean your laptop fans once a month. Get a can of compressed air with a thin nozzle and direct the air into your laptop fans and air vents. This increases airflow through the vents and reduces the amount of work your fans have to do.
  • Carry your laptop in a padded or fortified bag to minimize wear and tear while your laptop is in transit. One bad drop can wreck a hard drive or crack a screen.
  • Never carry the laptop by its corners or edges. This stresses the case, which leads to early fractures and cracks. A weakened case means the laptop is more prone to bending and twisting, which can damage internal components.
  • Remove the battery when the laptop is plugged in. Batteries can overheat or overcharge when plugged in, reducing their lifespan. Store your laptop in a cool, dry location to further increase battery lifespan.
  • Use your laptop on battery power until you get a low power warning, then plug it in and let the battery fully recharge.
  • Don’t put your laptop in Standby or Sleep mode. Sleeping laptops still use a little bit of electricity, which drains your battery, forcing you to recharge more often. The average laptop battery is good for about 500 charge/depletion cycles. Use Hibernate mode instead of Standby.

gleaned from ehow.com

Call us for all your desktop and laptop needs.

Larry The Computer Guy

Desktop and Laptop repair in Commerce MI

248-360-8967

How to make your Lithium-ion batteries last for years

lithium ionThe lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries used in most of today’s tablets, smartphones, and portable PCs require very different care and feeding than with the nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) and nickel-metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries used in earlier devices.

Keep your lithium batteries cool

I was surprised to learn that heat is the number-one enemy of Li-ion batteries. Heat issues can be caused by usage factors such as the speed and duration of battery charging and discharging.

Unplug the charger to save the battery

Overcharging — leaving a battery connected to a too-high voltage source for too long — can reduce a Li-ion battery’s ability to hold a charge, shorten its life, or kill it outright.

Don’t deep-discharge your battery

Not all discharge cycles exact the same toll on a battery. Long and heavy usage generates more heat, putting more stress on the battery; smaller, more frequent discharges extend the overall life of lithium batteries.

Slow and steady charge/discharge is best

As you now know, both fast discharging and fast recharging generate excess heat and exact a toll on battery life.

Whenever possible, carry a spare battery

If your device allows for easy battery replacement, carrying a spare battery is cheap insurance. It not only gives you twice the run time but also helps you avoid the need to fully discharge a battery or use a quick charge. When the in-use battery approaches 15–20 percent charge, simply swap out the drained battery for a fresh, cool one — you get instant full power, with no heat worries.

Gleaned from www.windowssecrets.com

Larry The Computer Guy

Computer and Laptop Repair in South Eastern Michigan

Servicing Commerce, White Lake, Milford, Walled Lake, Highland, Hartland, Brighton, Howell

248-360-8967

 

Windows 10 problems with old style CD-ROM games

gtaiv-press-100608376-largeSafeDisc and SecuRom DRM schemes are not allowed on Windows 10, which means the games that require it aren’t allowed either.

At the turn of the century, it was hard to find gamers—or gaming journalists, for that matter—who didn’t despise SecuRom and SafeDisc digital rights management copy protection on some of the top titles of that age. The DRM was accused of causing harware problems and were incredibly invasive on a user’s system. Those DRM mechanisms are gone now, but people still love to pop in their old Grand Theft Auto IV or Spore DRM-laden discs and play a little of these classics.

In Windows 10, however, that’s no longer possible: Windows 10 does not allow the SecuRom and SafeDisc DRM schemes to run, which means the games will fail to start. Boris Schneider-Johne, Microsoft’s German marketing manager for enthusiasts, explained the situation during Gamescom earlier in August (translation courtesy of Rock, Paper, Shotgun).

“Everything that ran in Windows 7 should also run in Windows 10. There are just two silly exceptions: antivirus software and stuff that’s deeply embedded into the system…old games on CD-Rom that have DRM…that’s where Windows 10 says ‘sorry, we cannot allow that, because that would be a possible loophole for computer viruses.’

The two DRM schemes were thankfully short-lived—they ran primarily between 2003 and 2008, according to Schneider-Johne—so the number of games affected by this is relatively small.

The impact on you at home: Windows 10’s refusal to run DRM is a very simple example of how owning digital property with copy protection never turns out well for the consumer. Some games may already have patches that fix the issues the DRM caused, or you can re-purchase the game from places such as GOG.com that sell versions already patched. Alternatively, you could just run an older system and not bother with the upgrade, or you could try running the games in a virtual machine.

Gleaned from pcworld.com, Ian Paul Contributor

Larry The Computer Guy

Laptop and Computer Repair in Commerce MI

248-360-8967

Home Users – Are you ready to make the jump to Windows 10

windows 10

Make The Jump

It’s been a couple of weeks now since Windows 10 was released by Microsoft. We have seen a couple of large updates to resolve issues with drivers. There are still some issues with video cards to be resolved. So if you are a home user and want to upgrade, here are some suggestions for you.

 

Only upgrade if your computer was purchased in the last couple of years.

Check the computer manufacturers website to make sure there are not any known issues for your particular computer. (For example; Asus Tiachi-21 there are no drivers available for the tablet screen, so if you upgrade, your tablet screen will not function.)

Make sure you backup all your data including pictures, files etc.

Make sure you have your copies of Office programs available with product keys to re-activate as necessary.

Most installed programs that have a product key need to be re-activated. Make sure you have access to those keys.

We recommend downloading the update to a flash drive, so you will need to have at least a 16 GB drive available. (This is very useful if you have a slow internet connection of if the update fails on the first attempt.

Make sure you have plenty of time available to complete the upgrade. You will need to be present to watch the update as it is running. (On fast machines this can be done in an hour or so. If you are upgrading a laptop it has taken 6 hours or more to complete the upgrade.)

 If you are wanting to upgrade, but you are unsure and need help, we are ready to help you.

Upgrade Special for Home Users only – $99 Good until August 31, 2015.

You must have a valid version of Windows which is upgradable. Does not include clean installs of the operating system.

Give us a call at 248-360-8967.

Please Note: For business users we still are recommending that you do not upgrade at this time. Stay tuned and we will let you know when we feel it is safe to upgrade.

Larry

Larry The Computer Guy

Computer and Laptop Repair in Commerce MI

Serving the area for 24 years